Worldview Loneliness in the Church

This is what it’s like to feel alone because of your Christian worldview in the Church.

My worldview loneliness is not provoked by the awkward discomfort that comes from sharing the Christian faith with an unbeliever in secular culture. Which is not to say evangelizing is easy for this introvert. No, that challenge is different. I expect a lost soul to find the Gospel offensive. The mocking, callousness and avoidance of the Gospel by unbelievers are understandable when in response to the Holy Spirit’s prodding at hearts and minds.

 

It is one thing to differ on music styles and wardrobe choices appropriate for Sunday morning service with your fellow church congregants. It is entirely another to disagree on the sacredness of sexuality, marriage, conscience, and life. One should be expected. The other is downright depressing. And yet, it’s an increasing occurrence within evangelical churches.

Last Friday, an acquaintance asked if I ever feel alone touting a Christian worldview in today’s culture and among my Millennial generation. She probably didn’t expect my answer. The times I’ve felt most alone were while defending my Christian convictions with members of my own church.

My worldview loneliness is not provoked by the awkward discomfort that comes from sharing the Christian faith with an unbeliever in secular culture. Which is not to say evangelizing is easy for this introvert. No, that challenge is different.

I expect a lost soul to find the Gospel offensive. The mocking, callousness and avoidance of the Gospel by unbelievers are understandable when in response to the Holy Spirit’s prodding at hearts and minds. Disagreements and withdrawals from lost souls does not usher in loneliness for the young conservative Christian, but merely offers perspective to the Great Commission.

Worldview loneliness manifests itself in the uninviting glares received after suggesting to a singles’ small group that abortion is a social justice issue too. Meanwhile, those you know understand the dignity of the unborn, silently lean­­­ in their chairs as far away from your direction as possible.

Or an alarming conversation with a youth minister who encourages you not to talk about sin, Hell, and the other traditional Christian teachings he labels as “legalism.”

How about the gloom that settles after a parent asks you and your co-teacher not to discuss the sin of same-sex marriage while her child is in your Sunday school class?

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