Godliness Is Not Your Personality

Why do we take our individual, personality, character, gifts, or calling and make that the sum total of godliness for everyone else?

Why do we take our individual, personality, character, gifts, or calling and make that the sum total of godliness for everyone else? The introvert equates godliness with quietness. The extrovert equates godliness with activity. The generous person equates godliness with giving. The social person equates godliness with hospitality.

The workaholic equates godliness with hard-work.

The pastor equates godliness with preaching gifts.

The counselor equates godliness with discipling gifts.

The home-educator equates godliness with home-schooling.

The missionary equates godliness with mission support.

The evangelist equates godliness with outreach.

The reader equates godliness with a large library.

The happy person equates godliness with cheerfulness.

The melancholy person equates godliness with guilt.

The courageous person equates godliness with public witness.

The political person equates godliness with social action.

The practical person equates godliness with doing.

The intellectual person equates godliness with thinking.

The emotional person equates godliness with feelings.

The friendly person equates godliness with having lots of friends.

The artsy person equated godliness with “cultural engagement.”

Godliness should be measured not so much by what comes easiest to us but by the progress we’re making in areas we’re weakest in.

David Murray is Professor of Old Testament & Practical Theology at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary. This article first appeared on his blog, Head Heart Hand, and is used with permission.



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