6 Tips for Reading the Bible with Your Kids

Why don’t we read the Bible one-on-one with our children? Wouldn’t it be wonderful to give our children that best of memories?

Like everything else in life, reading the Bible with our kids is much more likely to happen if it becomes part of our routine. It takes about 6–8 weeks to build a habit by doing something at the same time in the same place with the same person. There will be ups and downs in that period, with times of forgetfulness and catch-up, but it will eventually become part of the fabric of life.

 

Happy Childhood Memories

When we look back on our childhoods, among many other happy memories, we may recall our parents reading with us. “Jack and the Beanstalk,” “Little Red Riding Hood,” “Three Little Pigs,” and multiple other children’s classics cast a warm hue upon our earliest recollections.

So why don’t we do the same with the Bible? Why don’t we read the Bible one-on-one with our children? Wouldn’t it be wonderful to give our children that best of memories? If you haven’t started such a practice, let me give you some guidance to start the ball rolling.

1. Give them a good reason to read the Bible.

Students do best when they are motivated by the ultimate aim of their studies. That’s why it’s so important to answer the “Why?” question up front, and to keep it in front, when reading the Bible with our children.

“Why are we doing this?”

“We’re reading the Bible together because we want to know and love God, and live our lives for his glory and the good of others.” That’s my purpose statement. Yours may be slightly different, but without it, we won’t sustain the practice of reading the Bible with our kids. And let’s remind them of that glorious purpose continually, so that they too can catch the motivation.

2. Establish a routine.

Like everything else in life, reading the Bible with our kids is much more likely to happen if it becomes part of our routine. It takes about 6–8 weeks to build a habit by doing something at the same time in the same place with the same person. There will be ups and downs in that period, with times of forgetfulness and catch-up, but it will eventually become part of the fabric of life.

Try to find a slot in your schedule that you can commit to, push through the first 6–8 weeks, and you and your children will have formed a holy habit.

3. Be realistic.

As someone who once tried to teach my hyperactive five- and six-year-old sons Hebrew, believe me, I know the folly of unrealistic expectations. That lasted about four days. And that’s about how long many of our Bible reading plans last, too. We set Everest goals and don’t even get to base camp.

It took me many years to grasp the limitations of my children’s minds when it came to my spiritual ambitions for them. However, by the time the boys were about ten or eleven, I’d drastically lowered my goals, and then it began to click. We read less, but learned more.

4. Be systematic.

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